Has the Bermuda Triangle mystery been solved? Norwegian Researchers may have found the answer

There is a barrage of explanations over the internet that try to discern the Bermuda Triangle mystery. Lately, however, the internet has exploded after the discovery of gigantic underwater craters that have been unearthed at the bottom of Barents Sea. The discovery and subsequent presence of these craters has been equated with the mysterious disappearance of ships, aircrafts and people over the Bermuda Triangle.

Bermuda Triangle mystery
Image source: newswire.net

The origin of underwater sea craters

Researchers from the Arctic University of Norway have described the enormous sea craters in measurements of 3,280 feet in diameter and 131 feet in depth. These craters, apparently, have been a result of build-ups of methane off the coast of natural gas-rich Norway.

Barents sea has underwater methane deposits that supposedly explain Bermuda Triangle
Image source: www.pipeline-journal.net

Scientists propose that methane must have leaked from the deposits of oil and natural gas further below the surface and created cavities that eventually exploded. The area stretches from the British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic Ocean to the Florida coast, to Puerto Rico.

Barents sea underwater sea craters were formed from methane gas explosions
Image source: www.iflscience.com

Some of the features of the craters may also have resulted from the blow-outs of methane gas that migrated up from deep oil deposits and accumulated in shallow rocks from the Triassic period between 206 to 248 million years ago.

The connection between the underwater sea craters and Bermuda Triangle phenomenon

According to the scientists, the explosions eventuated in the formation of underwater craters that would open up and hence, pose risks to vessels travelling on Barents Sea. As per a Russian scientist- Igor Yeltsov, the deputy head of the Trofimuk Institute, there is a version that the Bermuda Triangle is a consequence of gas hydrates reactions. 

Underwater craters have been studied using 3-D seismic images
Image source: i.livescience.com

The reactions tend to actively decompose with methane ice turning into gas. It results in incredible amounts of gas. The result of this gas production is that it results in the ocean to heat up and ships sink in its waters that contain large proportion of gas.

But Hold on! The underwater crater theory seems to have been refuted as well

NOAA has refuted the theory of Bartens' sea craters involved in Bermuda triangle phenomenon
Image source: www.argos-system.org

There are couple of points that stand against the aforementioned hypothesis:

  1. There is still skepticism over how much energy is released in the crater forming explosions and whether they are energetic enough to sink ships.
  2. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), there is no conclusive proof that the disappearances occur with any greater frequency in the Bermuda Triangle than in any other large, well-traveled area of the ocean.
  3. After the Norwegian study went viral, one of their researcher Karin Andreassen clarified that they have not made any connection between the finding of craters and Bermuda Triangle.
  4. The Bermuda Triangle is off the eastern coast of Florida and the link of the study with this part of the world is still being doubted.

Whether or not this discovery successfully explains the Bermuda Triangle mystery will soon be discerned but for now, this strange part of the world will continue to baffle scientists and people, in general. (1, 2)

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